Say Something Nice Sunday June 3 Join the Movement

On June 3, all churches, all denominations and all faith groups are encouraged to join in the celebration of the 12th.  Say Something Nice Sunday. Originating at First Baptist Church of Charleston, South Carolina, the movement has gained followers from almost every denomination across the US and some in the UK.

The Rev. Marshall Blalock, president of the South Carolina Baptist Convention, and The Most Reverend Robert E. Guglielmone, Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Charleston, have both endorsed the program. There is nothing to buy.

Why Have a Say Something Nice Sunday? The simple answer is that words are powerful. Words have the power to build or destroy. Words have the power to heal or wound. With our words we have the power to build up a Christian community or to destroy it.

Nowhere are words more powerful than within the church. “The Word became flesh and dwelt among us.” Words take on a life unto themselves. Once they are given life they are on their way for good or evil.

This special day is an opportunity to build the community of faith, strengthen relationships and heal old wounds. Our national discourse has become so strident and even in religious circles the rhetoric is often far from Christ-like. In Philippians 1:27 we read, “Let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ.”

This is a day to say thank you to those who make our lives better just by being a part of them. This is a day to recognize those who contribute to our lives in specific ways. This is a day to apologize for words spoken in frustration, anger or disappointment.

One suggestion in addition to the main sermon is to use it as a theme for the Children’s Sermon as Robin Boston will do at the Circular Congregational Church in Charleston.

Mitch Carnell, Chair of the Ecumenical Committee said, “One day is one day, but perhaps we can stretch it to two days and then just maybe if we encourage one another and ask for God’s help, we might change the world!”

Free materials are available at www.fbcharleston.org. Click on Messages/Resources at the top of the page. Scroll down to Say Something Nice Sunday. There is also a Say Something Nice Day for secular celebration on June 1 every year.

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Loren Mead, author, teacher, and priest, has died – Great Loss – Good Friend*

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Born in Florence, South Carolina, on February 17, 1930, Loren B. Mead, graduated from the University of the South, and later earned an MA from the University of South Carolina.  After teaching in the Wil Lou Gray Opportunity School for Adults for two years, Loren attended Virginia Theological Seminary and received his Masters in Divinity in 1955 and was ordained an Episcopal priest.

He was an educator, consultant, and author who worked to strengthen religious institutions, especially of local congregations. Mr. Mead collaborated with lay people, clergy, executives and bishops, teachers, and others committed to ministry.  A pioneer in congregational studies, he brought together the methods of organization development consultation and applied research for working with congregations.

Born and raised in the segregated South, Loren worked for racial justice and reconciliation throughout his career. Besides marching with a delegation of white pastors in support of Martin Luther King after the death of Medgar Evers, he played a leading role in the desegregation of Chapel Hill.

As an author, he published four best-selling books on the future of the church; The Once and Future Church (1991), Transforming Congregations for the Future (1994), Five Challenges for the Once and Future Church (1996), and Financial Meltdown in the Mainline? (1998).  In addition to a number of articles and chapters in edited works, he is also the author of New Hope for Congregations (1972), Critical Moment of Ministry: The Change of Pastors (1987), The Whole Truth(1987), and More than Numbers (1994).  His most recent book, The Parish is the Issue refocused on his work with congregations as the future direction.

 

In his work with churches, Mead developed a number of resources on the role and work of the interim pastor, the use of conflict management, clergy stress and burnout, concepts of change and development in congregations and their judicatory systems, training methods for executives and bishops.  He was concerned for the personal, professional, and spiritual development of lay and clergy leaders, and especially for the creative possibilities for churches and leaders at moments of transition in role.

 

Mead’s work with the Alban Institute was informed by his career in the parish ministry. After serving in several parishes in North and South Carolina, as well as the UK, until the then Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, John Hines, asked him to direct that denomination’s experimental “Project Test Pattern” for a three-year period.  In 1974, Mead founded the Alban Institute, Inc., developing its national, multi-denominational network of research, publishing, education, and consulting.

 

Mead later received honorary degrees from the University of the South, Virginia Theological Seminary, Berkeley Divinity School at Yale,  and The Episcopal Divinity School.  In 1999, he was named the fifth recipient of the Henry Knox Sherrill Medal by the Episcopal Church Foundation.

Mead’s work lives on in the church. Alban at Duke Divinity, the successor to the Alban Institute, continues his agenda of research and consulting. Institutions like the interim pastorate and the Consortium of Endowed Parishes continue to express the concern for the life of local religious communities that was the heart of his professional vocation.

*Loren offered me great help when my own Church life was shaken.  I first met him at the Chautauqua Institution in New York State. He influenced me for the rest of my life.

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Waffle House, Trucks – and the Church – Bill Leonard -BaptistNewsGlobal

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Play-Doh – Shiny-Side – Up – Rev. Susan Sparks

I am assuming everyone reading this knows about Play-Doh—the cross between bread dough and modeling clay that came in those little goofy cans? You could get all different colors, make all kinds of cool stuff, and—in a pinch—it didn’t taste bad.
But here’s the thing I loved most about Play-Doh: If you didn’t like what you’d made, you’d just squish it down and start again. In short, you got a second chance. Ah, for those days again.
Back in the Play-Doh days as a kid, mistakes were just easier. Everything seemed to heal faster and easier. You skinned a knee—it healed in two days.  Your feelings got hurt—you forgot about it in half an hour.

But as life goes on, mistakes get harder. For one thing, they get bigger. And we all know that we can make some pretty monumental mistakes. Maybe it’s angry words or failing to say, “I’m sorry.” Maybe the mistake is ending a relationship or, in some instances, starting one. It could be a project we messed up at work or school. Or maybe it’s allowing our anger to fester inside too long,

Think about a mistake you’ve made recently, or a misstep, or a wrong word, or a bad choice. Do you want to start again? Well, you can. It’s two simple steps:

First, learn from your mistake. This first step is critical because if we don’t take the time to learn from our mistakes we will keep making the same mistakes. I’m sure you’ve heard this: “The definition of Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.” We must take the time to learn from our mistakes. And there’s always an opportunity for learning.

Second, we have to let our mistakes go. We waste so much time hand-wringing over mistakes. We get stuck there, beating ourselves up, feeling bad about ourselves, judging ourselves. And what good does that do? It just tears us down and wastes our energy.

We have to let go—not only of our mistakes but our fear of making another one. It’s like the old saying warns, “Better oops, than what if.”

What are the mistakes you’ve made recently?

Are you ready to move on?

Good! Then squish ‘em down and start again

 

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