Posts Tagged Charleston

Pillars of Say Something Nice Sunday

From the First Baptist Church of Charleston – August 31, 1791

We will be careful to conduct ourselves with uprightness and integrity, and in a peaceful and friendly manner, toward mankind in general, and toward Christians of all descriptions, in particular.

Unity in the Body of Christ – South Carolina Baptist Convention – 2007

Whereas Ephesians 4:29 (NIV) says, “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouth, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.”; and

Whereas we are reminded in Holy Scripture not to bear a grudge and to love one another (Leviticus 19:180; and

Whereas, Civility in public discourse (spoken and printed) appears to be declining among those of us who claim Jesus Christ as our savior; and

Whereas, in recognition of the negative effects that such behavior has on our wittiness; therefore, be it

Resolved, That we, the messengers of the South Carolina Baptist Convention meeting in Florence, South Carolina on November 13-14 2007, do proclaim our intent to foster a climate of Christian communication that brings honor to our Lord through encouragement and love, and be it finally

Resolved, that we encourage and support activities or programs that will help establish a positive dialogue, between Christians and with non-Christians that honors Christ.

The Catholic Diocese of Charleston – Most Reverend Robert E. Guglielmone, Bishop of Charleston – May 19, 2010

“Say Something Nice Sunday is a wonderful way to express our common love for each other as Christians. Our words should be used to express love not hatred. What better way can we express this belief than to celebrate a day devoted to healing with our words? I heartily endorse the mission of Say Something Nice Sunday and urge all Christians to participate. In 1 Corinthians 13:13, St. Paul tells us that the greatest virtue is love. What better way is there for Christians to express this virtue than to participate in Say Something Nice Sunday?

Cardinal Dolan of New York – March 29, 2011

“Say Something Nice Sunday certainly seems like a great idea to me. How wonderful it would be if all churches and their members decided to say something positive about other Christians and Christian groups at least one Sunday per year in recognition of our common belief in Christ.”

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Waffle House, Trucks – and the Church – Bill Leonard -BaptistNewsGlobal

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Baptists in Early North America: First Baptist Church, Boston, Massachusetts,

Edited by Rev. Dr. Thomas R. McKibbens.  Macon, Mercer University Press. ©2017. $60.

Reviewed by: Mitch Carnell

Reading about the beginning struggles of the First Baptist Church of Boston should cause every Baptist heart to swell with pride. These pioneers in the faith suffered unbelievable persecution. Massachusetts was simply not a good place to be if you believed in freedom of religious conscious. Decenters were publicly whipped and jailed.

The founding members worshiped in people’s homes before erecting a meetinghouse. The doors to their first meetinghouse were nailed shut by the authorities on March 8, 1679. At least for one week the congregation met outside in the cold. Religious freedom did not come to Massachusetts until a new constitution was adopted in 1833.

The Boston Church was not the first Baptist Church in New England but it grew to be one of the most influential spreading its influence from Boston to South Carolina. The connections between the First Baptist Church of Boston and the First Baptist Church of Charleston are strong. The first pastor of the Charleston church was ordained by the Boston church. William Screven established a church in Kittery, Maine before moving his flock to Charleston. When the Boston church was without a pastor in 1707, he was invited to return to Boston as pastor but declined the offer.

The most successful pastor of the Boston Church, Samuel Stillman, was trained by the pastor of First Baptist Church Charleston, Oliver Hart, and ordained by him in 1759.  Stillman served the Boston church for over 40 years. The meetinghouse was expanded twice during his pastorate. He and his Charleston mentor were both originally from Philadelphia where Baptists were more welcome.

The minutes of the First Baptist Church of Boston, 1635 -1830, provide both informative and interesting reading. The handwritten minutes are contained in two leather bound volumes currently located in the Franklin Trask Library at Andover Newton Theological Seminary. McKibbens, has meticulously and painstakingly transformed these priceless records into a form accessible to every interested scholar or layman. These minutes faithfully record insights into church doctrine, politics, finances, church discipline and church personalities. McKibbens speaks of his joy in being able to handle these documents. He served as interim pastor while preparing the manuscript.

Dr. McKibbens has produced a volume of great value to anyone interested in religious freedom and the growth and history of Baptists in America.

The Rev. Dr. Thomas McKibbens is no stranger to South Carolina Baptists. He was a speaker for the Charleston County Baptist Association and at the John Hamrick Lectureship. He delivered the sermon at the 325th Anniversary Celebration of First Baptist Church of Charleston.

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A Day of Repentance – Mayor John Tecklenburg

“Sometimes I think that we should have a day of repentance in Charleston for all the bad in our past, especially racism.” Mayor John Tecklenburg said while speaking at the fourth and final Lenten Series for 2017 held at St. John’s Lutheran Church.

“After repentance, then what? How do we make amends for the past?

”Perhaps better education for everyone or affordable housing or more equity in our law enforcement, these would be good ways to start. I was in the eighth grade in Orangeburg when the Orangeburg Massacre occurred and I was running for the Office of Mayor of Charleston when the massacre happened at Mother Emanuel Church.  The dialogue instantly changed from how will our city survive after Joe Riley leaves office to what is next for our city. The response of the people at Mother Emmanuel set an example for our city and Charleston set an example for the whole world.

The music for the program was outstanding. Following the message there was a time for laying on of hands for blessing and healing conducted by the ministers from the cooperating churches: St. John’s Lutheran, First Baptist, First Scots Presbyterian and St. Michael’s Episcopal.

St. John’s provided a lunch for all attendees after the service. I was torn but opted for lunch at the Variety Store.

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