Posts Tagged creative

“Ga-head, Tell Me I’m Unworthy” – Susan Sparks – Shiny Side Up

JUSTICE UNCATEGORIZED POSTED ON SEP 18, 2017 BY SUSAN SPARKS

“Ga-head, Tell Me I’m Unworthy”

This blog was also preached as a sermon at the historic Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. View it on YouTube.

A long time ago, in a land far away . . . I was young. In that time of tender youth, third grade to be exact, I decided to flaunt my budding creative/performer genes and do a book report in front of my class. Feeling that everyone else’s report before me had been lame (at best), I decided to act mine out. And I chose a book – on Elvis.

So here I was standing outside my classroom door, waiting to make my grand entrance, and I glanced at the reflection of myself in the glass doors. The polyester pants, go-go boots, and plastic guitar weren’t that big a deal – but the sideburns, oh yes, the sideburns, they were a problem. I constructed them of cotton balls that I had dyed black with shoe polish and glued to the sides of my face. They may, perhaps, be over the top, I thought to myself.

Before I had time to reconsider, the door opened and our teacher’s voice bellowed out: “Our next book report is by a special guest all the way from Memphis, Tennessee. Boys and girls, please welcome Elvis!”

I took a deep breath and walked into the classroom, strumming the guitar, singing “Hound Dog,” and making a motion that looked like I was doing a hula hoop.

When I finished my grand entrance, I stopped and struck an Elvis-esque pose.  “Thank ya, thank ya vur much.” I was so proud. I thought I had just done the greatest thing ever. But then I came back to Earth and realized that there was utter silence from the class. Then hysterical laughter. And not laughter as in this is funny, but laughter as in she is so weird. And they kept laughing, even the teacher was laughing. My nemesis, Allen Roberts, yelled out, “You’re stupid!” and that’s when Elvis, tearing up, ran out of the room and left the building.

While I got a “B” on the book report (I think out of pity), that experience branded an ominous message into my little 8-year-old brain. Creativity, uniqueness – who I was at my core – was bad. It made me different – and being different meant people would reject you.

My story is rather privileged, as I could camouflage the creativity. But there were other kids in the class who were judged and couldn’t camouflage – like my friend Cassandra who was one of the few black students in the school. She was set apart as different and couldn’t morph or change, and had to deal with the rejection head on.

There are many versions of this story in life, where who we are at our core sets us apart as different. It could be our personality; it could be our inherent gifts; it could be our race, our gender, our language, our religion, our nationality, our sexual orientation. And the world judges different as bad and rejects it.

We’ve all experienced it in some form – some of us on a more privileged level and some of us not. But the result of being different – no matter how we experience it – generates the same obstacle. And that obstacle is shame.

Shame is corrosive, it eats away at us from the inside. It dictates our choices because we treat ourselves as we see ourselves.

If we don’t see ourselves as worthy, then we will drive ourselves into the ground in an attempt to become worthy. We will say yes to everything. We will fight to be the best at everything. We will destroy ourselves in order to be worthy.

Brothers and sisters – my message today is three words: We – are – worthy. Every single one of us is worthy. And here’s three reasons why:

1) Our worth is not based on the judgment of the world.

Just look at God’s words to Samuel: “Do not consider appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. The Lord does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart” (1 Samuel 16.7).

2) Diversity is our strength.

Diversity is nature’s strength. We see it from Mount Everest to Death Valley, Pekinese to draft horses, black holes to exploding stars, the Navaho people to the Maasai tribesman in Tanzania. Nature’s ability to change, adapt, and evolve comes from its diversity.

So, too, diversity is our strength — our greatest gift. It’s what sets us apart in the sea of robotic corporate soldiers. It’s what makes each of us irreplaceable.

The tragedy is that in constantly shunning our diverse gifts, we grind down our uniqueness to a smooth, slab of conformity.. It’s like the old saying, “If you try and hammer a round peg into a square hole, you destroy the peg.”

3) Authenticity is our gift – our greatest gift.

The psalmists tell us that. “For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139:14).

The jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker put it another way. “If you don’t live [the blues], it won’t come out your horn.”

God made us this way; gave all of us fearful and wonderful gifts. Who are we to tell God that we’re not worthy?

I am reminded of the powerful words of Kristin Beck, a retired Navy Seal hero – deployed 13 times over two decades, including stints in Bosnia, Iraq, and Afghanistan. She received the Bronze Star Medal for valor and the Purple Heart for wounds suffered in combat. She is also transgender.

And when our President announced this summer that the US military would bar transgender people from serving, her response: “Let’s meet face-to-face, then you tell me I’m not worthy.”(As a New Yorker, I imagine her saying in a slightly different way: “Tell him to meet me face-to-face. Then, @!#&(%*# Ga-head, tell me I’m unworthy!”)

When we live into our truth, when we stand firm in the face of judgment, we are a witness and an invitation to others to do the same. Of course, we may never know it. But just because we don’t see a big scoreboard with the names of the people healed, helped by our actions – doesn’t mean they are not there. It’s like the old saying, “The farmer does not put a seed in the ground then scream over it. In faith, he leaves it alone.”

So we plant, we wait, and we live into our truth. We stand firm in the face of judgment, and we offer a witness and an invitation to others to do the same.

This week, when the world starts to tell us that we’re lesser, when we feel ourselves beginning to shrink, pull away, weaken . . .

Remember those words in Jeremiah;

Remember that diversity is our strength and authenticity is our gift;

Remember the image of US Navy Seal hero Kristin Beck, so that when the world comes at us with judgment and shame, we too can stand face-to-face with our critics, and say with power and authority, “Ga-head, tell me I’m unworthy.”

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Director of Human Resources of the Year – Suzanne Smith

Presented by:  Mary Powers

Our Human Resources Director of the year truly exemplifies all of our Davidson and Pivot core values.

This person’s work with creative and far reaching recruiting ideas truly shows how this person creates value every day. From working with and learning about veterans transitioning to civilian jobs following active duty, to attending a local job fair that specializes in hiring individuals with disabilities – this person is letting love guide their work.
Talk about love – this person serves others with love always.  Each year they end their Team Member Appreciate Week with a volunteer day at a local charity in their town.

This person knows that greatness requires risk and attends a local school’s career summit that works to create hotel summer internships to encourage careers in hospitality. They have the back of all her team members and has special connections with all.

This HRD is very innovative and has some “expec SEAL ly” wild ideas to raise funds for GKTW. This person is always staying hungry when we ask for help on a transition or open HRD spot – this HRD is first to raise their hand.

We are honored to have this HRD on our team and it is with a thankful heart that I award Suzanne Smith our Human Resources Director of the Year.

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES OF THE YEAR GOES TO

SUZANNE SMITH, FRANKLIN MARRIOTT COOL SPRINGS

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168 Ways To Communicate Better Now Plus Two – 16 – 17 – 18

16. Be competent.

Perfect your skill and talents.

Stay current.

Practice, practice, practice  

17. Be cooperative.

Join in.

Offer assistance.

Be a team player.

Do more than expected of you.  

18. Be creative.

Get out of your box.

Use your imagination.

Keep asking, what if.

Surround yourself with creative people.

 

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Thankful Thursday – The Rev. Phillip Bryant

            On this Thankful Thursday, I am thankful for the gifts The Rev. Phil Bryant brings to my life. I first met Phil years ago through Tita and Charlie Heins. They thought that he hung the moon and I felt the same way about them. Phil is the senior pastor of the French Protestant Huguenot Church in Charleston. He is a graduate of Charleston Southern University when it was still the Baptist College. He is a native of Lyman, South Carolina and is an ordained Baptist minister. He gives much of the credit for his success to the encouragement he received from the late Dr. John A. Hamrick. Phil is a member of the Hamrick Lectureship Committee and one of the Lunch Bunch that meets on Mondays. He knows practically everyone and is a fantastic story teller. He has a creative mind that absorbs the meaning of every encounter. He is a genius at putting the right people together. He and Margaret were married several years after the death of his first wife from cancer. Before accepting his current position, he was a member of the staff at CSU. Phil is an ardent reader and a fantastic conversationalist. He is a great encourager. Phil Bryant brings so many gifts to my life and on this Thankful Thursday I want him to know how grateful I am.

            Thankful Thursday is a day set aside to recognize the importance of someone to our lives and to let her or him know of our gratitude. Develop an attitude of gratitude. Say Something Nice; Be a Lifter. You will be glad that you did.

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