Posts Tagged culture

Religion in Global Affairs – Martin Marty -ethicsdaily.com

Martin Marty (The Martin Marty Center: Sightings)*

Religion in Global Affairs | Martin Marty, Sightings, Religious Freedom 

University professors of religious studies and participants in interfaith explorations in many locales had to cheer to hear Kerry, a long-time advocate of religious understandings in international affairs, Marty writes.

When in the 1980s, Scott Appleby and I were first chartered to deal with one particular public expression of religion, the complex of militant fundamentalisms, we were confronted with a global scene for which we were not prepared.

We soon found out also that very few others were equipped to monitor and highlight these and other negative and positive religious outbursts. We were well supported and soon well surrounded by the few pioneers in this field.

Domestically, two factors have forced awareness on conscientious people.

The polarization of citizens on what came to be called “social issues” revealed that most of the troubling (and promising) topics had their roots in religion.

Also, much of the ammunition in the soon-stimulated “culture wars” dealt with religion among fighting factions.

Whether or not publics are more ready now than they were decades ago to deal with this new world is up for debate.

Meanwhile, the searches for and promotion of the understandings of religion in domestic affairs was eclipsed by the urgent signals tabbed “global.”

Appleby has gone on to head work on these subjects at the University of Notre Dame.

He and his scholarly companions are not focused on military affairs, on what can explode louder and kill more, but on the underlying informing and motivating elements in conflict and peace-making.

Often, “religion in global affairs” gets exploited by those who are absolutist about one religion versus others, that is, Christianity versus Islam and vice versa.

Exploiters profit when ignorance rules. It is therefore cheering when the public hears cautionary words from leaders, comments on misused religion or celebratory words when someone gets something right.

Tuesday, April 26, we on the sidelines had reason to applaud when U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry made international news with an address at the James Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston, an agency which regularly provides a forum for those who would go deep in their explorations.

Kerry went deep. University professors of religious studies and participants in interfaith explorations in many locales had to cheer to hear Kerry, a long-time advocate of religious understandings in international affairs.

His words countered those of partisans at home and abroad who use religion to advance causes of hate and distortion.

Thus, Mr. Kerry, “It is up to us to recognize that we can’t lead a world that we don’t understand, and that we can’t understand the world if we fail to comprehend and honor the central role that religion plays in the lives of billions of people.”

Kerry returned to some of his familiar themes including, first, that those who suppress religious freedom feed angers that make people more susceptible to recruiting by terrorists.

Second, religious groups, because when they are demonstrably concerned with “stewardship of the Earth” may have many positive contributions to make.

And, third, religions are mandated to help the poor and the marginalized. So their interest in job creation globally makes them vital.

Some who read or hear Kerry (parts of whose speech are available online) will think he lives in a dream world if he thinks religions are ready to make such contributions.

Some will resent his praise of religion because they see religions by definition opposed to human good.

But the majority, if they tune in and are turned on by the secretary of state’s words, can be readied to get back to the sources of their faith, heed the community-building (as opposed to terrorist-feeding) uses of religious mandates and promises, and offer hope for a better future.

Martin E. Marty is the Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago. A version of this article first appeared on Sightings, a publication of the Martin Marty Center at the University of Chicago Divinity School, and is used with permission. You can follow Sightings on Twitter @DivSightings. He was a speaker at the Hamrick Lectureship at First Baptist Church of Charleston, SC.

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As for Me and My House, Call Me a Thug – Connie Stinson – ABP

DAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2014 COMMENTARIES

As for me and my house, call me a thug

It is past time to realize that division only brings more division.

By Connie Stinson

I pastor a racially mixed church in a densely populated Maryland suburb of Washington. We accurately call ourselves diverse.

One month ago, one of our young adults, a particularly gifted 20-year-old, preached “Judge Not” from my pulpit and further exclaimed, “As a young black male, I am often followed through a store by a suspicious security guard. It’s my life.” The parents of color in the congregation didn’t blink an eye. They understood this young man’s painful reality. The message that we should judge not hit home that day.

While I sorely grieve the violence in Ferguson, I also recognize it as one of many indications that our country is being shredded into factions of hate and deep-seated prejudice. That is why we are joining our District of Columbia Baptist Convention on Sunday mornings to pray to end violence in a nation that needs peace.

I was in Missouri last week, less than seven days after the shooting of Michael Brown. My first full day there was the Sunday after. The Ferguson-focused reports saturated local media, local pulpits and local conversations. My Sunday afternoon dinner with extended family from southern Missouri represented three churches they attended that morning.

“What did your pastor say about Ferguson this morning?” I asked. I was wondering how (or if) Christian compassion might express itself in the politically and theologically conservative, whiter, geographically-closer context. I was told, and I personally witnessed as I sat beside my mother in her church that morning, that “all sides were prayed for.” Another said, “We prayed for the family of Michael Brown as well as for the safety of the police officer. We also prayed for all the thugs there.”

Thugs? That was a word I hadn’t heard in a while. What exactly is a thug? The next day, I heard the word used repeatedly by TV newscasters. Wow, apparently it was a popularly understood term, whatever its meaning. My insides grimaced. It was yet another label that we human beings thoughtlessly use to judge and divide, but here it was being used as a regular noun like “boy” or “girl.” I looked it up. Its textbook definition is a person of violence, especially a criminal. Its street slang meaning is one who wanders, looking for meaning in life.

In my view, David True’s words ring painfully true, especially, “The equation black = criminal is built into our culture’s deepest sinews.” We are a country divided by our own fear and our own sick efforts to maintain law and order. It is past time to realize that we are all human beings with the same needs. It is past time to realize that division only brings more division. It is past time to realize that human connection, brought by compassionate listening, is the only way to break down the barrier wall that divides us.

As for me, call me a thug. Never mind that I’m a 58-year old white woman pastor. For that matter, call my whole church a bunch of thugs. I reject the old-school definition; we are not violent criminals. I am claiming the truth in that slang version of the word. Though we do not do it well a lot of the time, we aim at meaning, especially when it comes to seeking unity in diversity. Sometimes we wander, sometimes we go backwards, and sometimes we attempt to march boldly into the future. But the goal is to be meaningful and make a difference in the name of love.

Isn’t that what it’s supposed to be about? May God forgive us all, including our own country, for being much less most of the time.

“For he is our peace, who has made us both one, and has broken down the dividing wall of hostility.” (Ephesians 2:14)

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Connie Stinson

Connie Stinson is pastor of Luther Rice Memorial Baptist Church in Silver Spring, Md.

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