Posts Tagged thanks

Thanksgiving – Rev. Susan Sparks – SunySideUp.com

Hi Y’all, welcome to the Shiny Side Up! A journal of infectious inspiration that will lift you up, make you smile and leave you stronger!A couple of things. First, life has been a bit busy around here, and as a result, I’m afraid delivery of the Shiny Side Up has been a bit sporadic. Starting today, I commit to sharing the Shiny Side Up with you every other Wednesday!

Second, while the Thanksgiving holiday has officially past, I still want to share this column with you. It talks about the importantce of gratitude which never goes out of season! It was featured as a syndicated newspaper column on Thanksgiving Day. In fact, I’d like to shamelessly sharing a letter to the editor in the Daytona Beach News-Journal about this particular column. I’m super proud of it!

How to give thanks
Susan Sparks wrote a sparkling essay — not a sermon — on the meaning of Thanksgiving and, indeed, on the essence of all that the word “giving” connotes.

Susan Sparks embodies what is best in any minister, rabbi or priest: A sense of humor as she conveys a message of profound significance and a sense of gratitude for what we’ve been given.

As she quotes from The Bible, “God loves a cheerful giver.” It gives a new perspective to what we understand when we think of charity and giving to others less fortunate.

Thanks for publishing Sparks’ heartfelt column.

John P. Stark, Port Orange

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Now . . . for the column!

It’s hard for me to believe that New York City (where I now live) is part of the same country as North Carolina (where I was born). Everything is different: food, clothing, the pace at which people walk, and the accents. Oh, the accents.

I don’t mean any disrespect, but New York accents are just wrong—meaning they fall in the wrong place.

For example, in the south the object one holds over one’s head in a rainstorm is pronounced, “UM-brella.” New Yorkers talk about some foreign object called an “um-BREL-la.”

The southern word for the flat screen on your wall that allows you to binge on Netflix is “TEE-vee.” New Yorkers use some alien multi-syllable conglomeration of “television.”

Some may see this to be a meaningless linguistic tussle. However, when you consider the word describing this week’s national holiday, you realize that there is more at stake than you may think.

Unlike New Yorkers who say, “ThanksGIVING,” Southerners call this holiday “THANKS-giving.” Why? Because that’s what the holiday is about! THANKS. Not giving.

The thanks must come first because you can’t truly give FROM the heart, unless you have gratitude IN your heart. It’s as 2 Corinthians 9:7 says, “God loves a cheerful giver.”

This is an important lesson as we begin this holiday season. While loving, joyful giving should be the focus of the coming weeks, giving usually turns into an exhausting act of duty. Like the conviction that you have to make two potato dishes—sweet potatoes and mashed potatoes—for the holiday dinner. Or the belief that you must fight the Black Friday crowds to get a generic scarf and mitten set for a great aunt twice-removed because she sent you a Whitman’s Sampler.

This is not joyful giving. This is giving cause you gotta. And this type of giving rarely produces anything heartfelt. What it does produce is heartburn. It also generates stress, resentment, and the worse of all things: the martyr syndrome.

To break from this pattern, we must put the emphasis on the “THANKS”—in the word for the holiday and in our lives. And the best way to do that is to ask yourself the following question:

What is good in my life?

When you focus on what you have, even if it’s the tiniest of things, you begin to feel gratitude. And when you have gratitude, everything changes: your mood lightens, your heart opens, and your mind starts to alter its perspective. Eventually, you see past the angst and realize that you are surrounded by blessings—blessings that you want to share.

So, what is good in your life?

Maybe you woke up feel physically stronger than usual. If so, find someone who needs physical help crossing the street or carrying groceries.

Perhaps, you have a plant blooming in your house. Take a photo and send it to someone whose heart is not blooming.
Is your blessing putting on a warm coat this morning? Find a way to share something warm, like a cup of coffee, with someone who needs it.

Or maybe you are one of the lucky people with the biggest of blessings: a job. (And please understand, I didn’t say a job you love. I mean a J-O-B with a C-H-E-C-K.) If that’s your blessing, then remember those who don’t have a job this holiday. Volunteer to serve a meal or be like the anonymous donor who recently paid off holiday layaway accounts at a Walmart.

This week, as you make your multiple potato dishes, and shop in the Black Friday chaos, raise thanks for what is good in your life, then share that blessing with joy. Give with a grateful, not grudging heart. Put the emphasis where it belongs. And remember, as we do in the South, that the holiday is pronounced THANKSgiving!

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Thankful Thursday – Say Thank You

westlakeStop whatever you are doing this minute and thank someone. There is someone nearby who has helped you, brightened your day, made you smile, made you think, lifted your spirits, shouldered part of your load, made you glad to be alive. Tell her or him of your gratitude. If the person is not present with you, telephone her or him, send an email or write and mail a note. Do not let the moment pass.

My mother dreamed of going to Cuba. She put it off until there was a better time. Castro took over. My late wife and I were going to Australia, but we put it off a year. She went to heaven instead. Dr. Harold Westlake, a god in the field of speech language pathology  – pictured, asked Don Bynum and me at one of our national conventions, “Boys where are your wives?’ “”At home,” we replied. “Boys don’t do that,” he said.

Never miss an opportunity to thank someone. It must be sincere. People know when you are just going through the motions. There are so many wonderful people in my life and in yours as well. Take notice. That’s all it takes. Say Thank You.

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Five U.S. Presidents, Five Great Americans – www.ethicsdaily.com

Five U.S. Presidents, Five Great Americans

Mitch Carnell Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 5:37 am

Five U.S. Presidents, Five Great Americans | Mitch Carnell, Democracy, Freedom, Presidents Those men can stand there together because each one knows fully the burdens that each one shouldered, Carnell writes. (Photo: Pete Souza/White House)

The picture of President Obama standing with the four living former U.S. presidents at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library in Dallas is a grand statement for us, and the rest of the world, as to whom we are.

No one had to die for any one of them to take office. None was deposed by some despot.

Each took office as a result of a vote by a free people. Each has his strengths and each has his weaknesses. Although each of us has our preferences, only time will sift through the remains for an accurate judgment.

Each one separately, and all of them together, tell a great story. Although each of these men is flawed in some dramatic way, I am happy to be represented by any one of them.

Along with whatever baggage each man carries, he is a great American. He has stood the test. He has walked through the fire and emerged a winner.

Your vote may have been different from mine, but that is the point. We do not have to agree to live together in peace. We do not have to think the same or vote the same.

I am happy with the choices I made and would make the same choices again. I am sure that you feel the same way about your choices.

Those men can stand there together because each one knows fully the burdens that each one shouldered.

Each one knows the agony, heartache, sleepless nights and the great joy of serving the American people. Each one understands that one word from any one of them during his turn in office could have plunged the world into instant chaos.

These are good men. They are us. Soon, too soon, each one of them will leave us. As each one goes, we will mourn his passing.

We will remember his accomplishments. We will lament his failures. In many cases, we will regret not heeding some of his advice.

Each has taken his turn on the world stage. The country, our country, will endure.

We are a strong people. We are resilient. We are capable of unbelievable acts that dishonor our national conscience, but we are also capable of unbelievable acts of honor, kindness and love.

For a season, we divide ourselves into blue states and red states, Democrats and Republicans, conservatives and liberals, gay and straight, but when some misguided individual or group tries to harm us, we become one people, indivisible.

I am proud of those five men pictured there because I am in the picture and so are you. We are all holding hands. When it matters, we are one.

I am for national health care, gun control and immigration reform, and I understand full well that you may not be. We will decide these issues at the voting booth.

Each of us will have the opportunity to state our case to anyone who chooses to listen. No one is forced to listen, and no one is forced to vote.

We are free to follow our consciences, but no one is forced to follow us. We are free to become involved, and we are free to sit on the sidelines.

I am free to worship as I choose, and I am free not to worship at all.

Sometimes in the heat of debate, we forget how fortunate we are. We are free to debate. That is a hard-won freedom.

Look, again, at these five men. With all of their faults and virtues, they are us.

I, for one, am giving thanks for them individually and collectively. You are free to join me.

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Random Acts of Kindness – 20

Someone needs to hear a simple thank you. Acknowledge the help you received from her or him. You will be glad that you did.

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