Posts Tagged uplifting

Celebrate Christian Communication

Sunday, June 3, 2012, will be different from all the Sundays that preceded it.  It will be a friendlier, more cheerful and more affirming day. Gone will be the rancor and demeaning verbiage. Across the nation churches will celebrate the Sixth Annual Say Something Nice Sunday. As bullying has escalated in all walks of life including some churches, the imperative to be more Christ-like in our speech takes on even greater significance.

                The congregation of First Baptist Church Charleston, the oldest Baptist Congregation in the South, passed a resolution calling for at least one day when Christians would not say anything derogatory toward any other Christian or Christian body, but instead would say only nice things. The Charleston Baptist Association passed the same resolution. The Charleston Atlantic Presbytery joined as did CBF of South Carolina. The first Say Something Nice Sunday was celebrated by churches in Charleston County and a scattering of churches throughout the state. The second year more churches joined across the nation. In 2009 the Catholic Diocese of Charleston joined.      

                In 2007 the South Carolina Baptist Convention passed a resolution,”Unity in the Body” which supports the idea. The movement received support from Dr. Frank Page, then president of the SBC, and Jim Austin, the SC Baptist executive. In 2011, the Catholic Archbishop of New York Timothy Dolan endorsed the program. Archbishop Dolan is now Cardinal Dolan. Furman University and Spartanburg Methodist College support the celebration. Dr. Molly Marshall, president of Central Baptist Seminary, Dr. Timothy George, president of Samford Divinity School and Dr. Loren Mead, retired Episcopal priest and founder of the Alban Institute, volunteered support.

                The Rev. Marshall Blalock, pastor of First Baptist Church of Charleston, is enthusiastic in his support of the movement. “Our words express what is in our hearts,” he states. The Rev. Andrew Shull, pastor of FBC Woodruff, SC did a week long emphasis.

                Every church and religious group are invited to participate. There are no fees and nothing to buy. Resource materials are on the First Baptist Church web page at www.fbcharleston.org. Click on Ministries at the top of the page and then click on Ministry Resources. Scroll down  to Say Something Nice Sunday.  Churches are encouraged to develop other materials and to share them by E-mailing them to lori@fbcharleston.org.

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Don’t Miss the Opportunity

            How often have you regretted not telling someone how much you loved or admired him or her? How often have you regretted not thanking someone for a kindness? How often have you regretted not picking up the telephone to congratulate someone or to express sympathy? June first is Say Something Nice Day. Don’t miss a wonderful opportunity to say something heartfelt and meaningful to someone you encounter. Life is made up of thousands of encounters. Some are enduring and some are quick, but all of them are important. No matter how brief the encounter, it leaves an impression. A touch no matter how light is still a touch.

            You have the power to make someone’s day better or worse simply with your words.  Whether the glass is half full or half empty is entirely up to you. All it takes is a smile and a hello. Where else can you get such a return for such a small investment? Sure, someone might growl at you or ignore your greeting. Suppose that happens, so what? Don’t let that person stop you from your mission. If we want the world to be a friendlier place, it starts with us. We can change the world. It is an opportunity open to the wealthiest among us or the poorest. Don’t miss the opportunity.

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A Proud Father on the 100th. Father’s Day

       web07108.jpg      How many fathers get to be introduced by their sons to a warm welcoming congregation on the 100th Father’s Day? That was my experience earlier today when I was the speaker at the Unitarian Church in Charleston. My grandchildren were there and so was my daughter-in-law. I was flattered by the invitation and warmed by the reception I received. My challenge to them as it is to all of us is to make an effort to turn down the harsh rhetoric, say something encouraging and uplifting to those we meet and to treat everyone with respect.

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